How to reduce chemo side effects or cope with them-- During your Chemo
How to reduce chemo side effects or cope with them-- During your Chemo

What is it like?

  • When you go in for a chemo appointment, there are usually fairly comfortable chairs around the room, a television and/or radio and reading lamps.
  • There are usually other people in the same room all receiving chemo.
  • The providers connect the bottle of chemo drugs to the patient through an IV (intravenous tube) so that the medicine goes directly into the blood stream.
  • Chemo “sessions” may be as short at 1 hour one day a week, or can be 9 hours three times a week.
  • Different types of drugs are used to treat different stages of cancer.
  • The length of each session and type of drugs used for chemotherapy depend on the stage of cancer and type of cancer cell (e.g., histologic grade and stage).
  • This means the person sitting next to you may also be a breast cancer patient, but may be receiving totally different medications within their chemo cocktail.

If you have lymphedema, bring a pillow or blanket to raise and rest your arm upon to help reduce the swelling

Bring a blanket with you into the chemo room.

  • During chemo, cold medication is slowly dripped into your blood stream through an IV (intravenous tube).
  • A lot of patients feel “cold” after a short while (30 minutes or an hour)
  • Ask your healer, minister or priest to bless your Indian blankets (for spiritual strength and physical warmth)




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