Native American Cancer Research-Colon Cancer Risk Factors
Colon Cancer:Men
Risk & Health Factors

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Risk Factors
Health Factors

Inherited disease:
Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), or Lynch syndrome
Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP)
Age 50 or older
Diabetes(Native)
Diabetes(non-Native)
Personal history of colorectal polyps:
Personal history of colorectal cancer:
Personal history of inflammatory bowel disease:
Family history of colorectal cancer: If you have a 1st degree relative (a parent, sibling or child) who was diagnosed with colorectal cancer or an adenomatous polyp before the age of 60 or you have 2 or more 1st degree relatives of any age diagnosed with colorectal cancer or an adenomatous polyp
Lack of physical exercise
Smoking
Alcohol intake
High dietary fat intake
Obesity (20lbs or more overweight)
Native American
Alaska Native
Northern Plains
Southern Plains
Native Americans
Pacific Coast
East
Southwest
African-American
White
Asian
Hispanic
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Risk Factors for Colorectal Cancer

Age: Over 90% of people diagnosed with colorectal cancer are older than 50.

Personal history of colorectal cancer: If you have had a prior diagnosis of colorectal cancer, even it has been successfully treated, you are more likely to develop a new colorectal. The risk increases if your 1st diagnosis was when you were 60 or younger.

Personal history of colorectal polyps: If you have had a polyp in your colon, particularly of the adenomatous type, you are at increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. The risk increases if you have a lot of polyps or if any polyp is large.

Personal history of inflammatory bowel disease: If you have been diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, you are at increased risk for colon cancer. The longer you have had IBD, particularly for more than 8 years, the higher your risk. You are not at increased risk if you have been diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

Family history of colorectal cancer: If you have a 1st degree relative (a parent, sibling or child) who was diagnosed with colorectal cancer or an adenomatous polyp before the age of 60 or you have 2 or more 1st degree relatives of any age diagnosed with colorectal cancer or an adenomatous polyp, you are at increased risk for colorectal cancer. About 15% of people who develop colorectal cancer will have family members with colorectal cancer.

Inherited diseases: An inherited genetic susceptibility occurs in about 3% to 5% of people who develop colorectal cancer. There are two common types of inherited colorectal cancer:

  1. Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), or Lynch syndrome (3%-4% of all colorectal cancers. If you inherited the gene from a parent.
  2. Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). FAP is a disease where people, usually between the ages of 5 and 40, often develop hundreds of polyps in their colon. About 1% of all colorectal cancers are due to FAP.

Ethnic background: There is an increased risk if you are of Ashkenazi Jewish descent (genetic mutations that do not fully explain the risk - only about 6% of American Jews have these).

Race: You are at increased risk if you are Alaska Native or Northern Plains in comparison to all other races and all other Native Americans.

MALE:
Alaska Natives = [101.4/100,000 incidence]
Northern Plains = [93.9/100,000 incidence]
Southern Plains = [71.1/100,000 incidence]
Pacific Coast = [54.1/100,000 incidence]
East = [32.6/100,000 incidence]
Southwest = [25.6/100,000 incidence]
African-American = [72.5/100,000 incidence]
Non-Hispanic white = [62.0/100,000 incidence]
Asian = [56.0/100,000 incidence]
Hispanic = [48.0/100,000 incidence]

FEMALE:
Alaska Natives = [107.8/100,000 incidence]
Northern Plains = [61.1/100,000 incidence]
Southern Plains = [53.4/100,000 incidence]
Pacific Coast = [38.0/100,000 incidence]
East = [37.2/100,000 incidence]
Southwest = [14.3/100,000 incidence]
African-American = [56.0/100,000 incidence]
Non-Hispanic white = [45.0/100,000 incidence]
Asian = [40.0/100,000 incidence]
Hispanic = [32.0/100,000 incidence]

Diet/Nutrition: If you have a diet high in animal fats, you may be at increased risk for colorectal cancer.

Physical inactivity: If you are not physically active, you have an increased risk for colorectal cancer.

Alcohol intake: If you have heavy alcohol consumption, you are at increased risk.

Increased risk and increased mortality:
These 3 are important because they confer increased mortality if you are diagnosed with colon cancer in addition to placing someone at higher risk because they are obese, smoke or have diabetes)

  1. Obesity: If you are 20 or more pounds overweight, your risk of dying from colorectal cancer is increased.
  2. Smoking: If you are a smoker, you are at increased risk (30% to 40% higher risk than those who do not smoke). The more you smoke and the longer you smoke, the higher the risk. It has been suggested that smoking may be responsible up to 12% of fatal colorectal cancers.
  3. ***Diabetes: If you have diabetes, you have an approximately 30% increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. You also may have an increased risk of dying from your colorectal cancer if you also have diabetes. Diabetes is so high in Native Americans, there is a distinction for being Native and having diabetes)

This page was created and is maintained by Rick Clark · · Last update: Thursday, 21 January 2016 ©2016 NACR
The "Colon Cancer Risk Factors" pages are supported by MAYO "Spirit of E.A.G.L.E.S."