NACES - Introduction
Introduction to the Physical Activity Branch

While going through cancer treatments, few patients feel well enough to take part in physical activity. In years past, doctors recommended "rest". They still do when you are not feeling well. You need to make certain your body has had time to heal from surgery. You do not want to tear any stiches or injury yourself in any way.

But there are changes since the 2000s. What a surprise! Now research shows cancer survivors who take part in some movement and activity, even if a small amount can help themselves. How? Well, physical activity helps shorten the length of time patients feel fatigue. This is by several months! Activity also helps reduce pain and "chemo brain" in a lot of patients. Getting out of bed and walking around the house may be a major effort at first. Some days are better than others and energy levels go up and down. So be patient with yourself. Do what you can. Do not risk injury to yourself. The cancer has caused enough injury to your body, mind, emotions and spirit. Let yourself take part in physical activity when you feel able.

While going through cancer treatments, few patients feel well enough to take part in physical activity. In years past, doctors recommended "rest". They still do when you are not feeling well. You need to make certain your body has had time to heal from surgery. You do not want to tear any stiches or injury yourself in any way.

Most cancer patients feel quite limited in physical activity during treatment. So, take part as your treatment ends and as you recover from your cancer treatment.

Obviously, physical activity is good for people who do not have cancer (like your family members and friends). Research shows that physical activity reduces the risk of most cancers by up to 30% and plays a role in lowering your risk of other cancers (breast, colon, prostate). Ask them to do activities with you. It helps them too.




Wanda Quick Bear - Physical Activity


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